Skip to main content

Troika Ranch - Loop Diver

View on Troika Ranch Vimeo Channel
 
loopdiver 2009 from troika ranch on Vimeo.

From Troika Ranch website

"The development of loopdiver began with a simple idea: to explore the concept of loops, a structure pervasive in culture since the popularization of the computer. We first created a 6-minute long performance that was complete in its own right, with movement, music, video and theatrical lighting; then, using a special software tool, we transformed a videotape of that performance into a 60-minute long choreographic 'score' from which we rigorously generated the live choreography. While the digital materials (video, sound, light) maintain the absolute precision and perfection of the computer, the learned choreography is necessarily imperfect due to human interpretation. When placed together on stage, we see the performers in a constant struggle to adapt to an externally imposed machine rhythm. loopdiver asks the viewer to join in on this simultaneously dreamlike and maddening journey as the performers attempt to escape their prisons of repetition. The meaning of the materials grows and changes as it appears again and again, ultimately challenging us to dive in a break free of our own repetitive and potentially destructive behavior."
source: http://www.troikaranch.org/vid-loopDiver.html


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Reading Noël Burch Theory of Film Practice - Ch 1

Gathering together examples referenced in Noël Burch's Theory of Film Practice, chapter 1



The most profound aspect of this chapter for me is near the end when Burch urges for filmmakers to:

"develop new "open" forms that will have more in common with the formal strategies of post-Debussyian music than with those of the pre-Joycean novel."

Burch discusses the potential for a third meaning (beyond shooting script and technical plan ) for découpage  


" no longer referring to a process taking place before filming or to a particular technical operation but, rather, to the underlying structure of the finished film.  Formally, a film consists of a succession of fragments excerpted from a spatial and temporal continuum.Découpage in its third French meaning refers to what results when the spatial fragments, or, more accurately, the succession of spatial fragments excerpted in the shooting process, converge with the temporal fragments whose duration may be roughly de…

Futurism – Movement and Sensation

FUTURISM - MOVEMENT AND SENSATION
by Maura McDonnell

Futurism praised and glorified the energy, speed and danger of machines in art.  The futurists had disgust for and rebelled against the 'relics of the past' (interestingly these relics in museums were ok for the old, the disabled and prisoners - people with no future?).  The new beauty was not the old art of the past, such as the sculptor piece 'Victory of Samothrace', but the beauty of speed.


How was something so ephemeral and invisible to the eye as speed to be rendered in painting?
Something invisible but felt?

In the two painting manifestos and in particular the Technical Manifesto of Futurist Painting, added to the futurist list of statements is the celebration of science - 'victorious science'.  Science could reveal what was hidden in nature and to our vision, x-rays had penetrated the 'opacity' and materiality of the body.  Chronophotography and the time-lapse photography of Eadweard Muybridge

Reading Noël Burch Theory of Film Practice - Ch 2

Chapter 2 - Nana, or the Two Kinds of Space



EXAMPLES  discussed by Burch in this chapter

Jean Renoir - Nana (1926) - excerpt


Ewald Andre Dupont - Variety (1925)
Extensive use of off-screen space
Excerpt below


Excellent video essay available on youtube by Kristin Thompson
http://youtu.be/X4Tov1vgoVI
Excellent article at:
http://alsolikelife.com/shooting/2008/12/739-80-variete-aka-variety-aka-vaudeville-1925-ea-dupont/

Full film
(at around 67 minutes the fight and knife scene)
The film is famous for its extensive use of off-screen space.  Burch discusses the particular scene.
"Because during a fight scene that soon became famous, Emil Jannings and his rival roll on the ground, leaving the screen momentarily empty. A hand with a knife in it then enters the frame from below and immediately plunges out of frame again to deliver the fatal blow. Jannings then rises up and into frame all by himself . . . and several generations of film historians applauded this "magnificent understateme…